I am from Missouri.  It is the show me state.  If you say you have something then our answer is show me.  If you say you can build a house thatís great, but you need to show me to convince me.  First draw it out on paper.  Then build it.  If it is a house then we know you can build a house.  If you canít then as far as we are concerned youíre ďFull of itĒ.

I have said the atoms, molecules, and compounds are composed of key ring atoms.  I have also stated that gases bounce, liquids roll, and solids lay flat.  Now, itís my turn.  I have to show you.  First, I will show it to you on paper.  Then, I will show you models we have built.   If my theory is correct a model of helium will never lay flat.

Below is a model of helium.  It has 4 dark proton rings in the center.  It has a lot of red electron rings around the proton rings.  Notice the outside of the helium.  It is round.  This illustration is a hot helium molecule, it will bounce.  Imagine the electron rings as being smaller for a cold helium molecule.  The outside will still be round, no matter how small the electron rings get.  The round molecule will be round and it will roll.  It will become a very small ball.  It will never lay flat.  It will never freeze.  This is called the super fluidity of helium.

Illustration Of Helium

Thatís showing it on paper.  The next thing to do is build a model.  I got some wire, some fishing line, and some glue.  I paid my children to make the model.  They took the wire and wrapped it around some pipe to form the circles.  They then tied the proton rings together.  The proton rings are blue.  Then they tied in the electron rings.  The electron rings are red.  They only used a few electron rings so the proton rings can be seen.  If you use too many electron rings you have a shell and you canít see the middle.  We have no way of causing the proton rings and electron rings to circle, so they glued all the proton rings and electron rings in place.  The picture is below.  My children are in grade school and high school.  My son that is in the 6th grade is holding a hot helium molecule model.  Notice it is round.  The density is low it will bounce.  My son that is in the 5th grade is holding the cold helium molecule model.  The electron rings are the same size as the proton rings. I think this atom would be close to absolute zero. The density of the cold is higher than that of the hot.  Notice it is round and much smaller than the hot helium.  No mater how cold helium gets, it wonít lay flat.  It will roll and be a liquid.   This is a simple answer to the super fluidity of helium.

Caleb, Jilli & Eli - Holding Helium

This is another picture of the hot and cold helium molecules side by side.  You can see the difference in size and density.  You can also see both are round.

Illustration Of Hot And Cold Helium

The theory of the standard model of helium has 2 protons, 2 neutron, and 2 orbiting electrons.  This model was considered to be a miniature solar system.  This atom vibrates to produce hot and cold.  This theory came out over 90 years ago.    Can grade school children build a model of a miniature vibrating solar system that explains why helium wonít freeze?  Can high school children build a model of a miniature vibrating solar system that explains why helium wonít freeze?  Can college students build a model of a miniature vibrating solar system that explains why helium wonít freeze?  Can our top physicist build a model of a miniature vibrating solar system that explains why helium wonít freeze?   No, they canít.  No plausible solution to why helium wonít freeze has ever been produced to my knowledge.  Why canít it be explained?  Itís because the geometry of the standard model is wrong.

If grade school children can build something that our top physicist canít then you should be seeing some big red flags waving.  Use your brain.  Believe what your eyes are telling you.  Listen to your common sense.  When it comes to the atom, PT Barnum may be right.  I am from Missouri.  If the standard model of the atom is so good then ďShow MeĒ a model that explains why helium wonít freeze.